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Full text of "Medic : the 1971 yearbook of the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital"

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Pre-Clinical Years 



ANATOMY 



PHYSIOLOGY 



It was 1:30 in the afternoon on my first day of classes at 
Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, when I began my 
ascent to that large fourth floor room in the Eccles Building. I 
knew that I was on my way to the anatomy laboratory where I 
would find a cadaver. Yet as I reached the final landing in the 
stairwell with only 25 steps left between me and the living 
dead, a sudden rush of blood overwhelmed my heart, with 
each subsequent beat resounding loudly and clearly at my 
temples. My legs became weak and wobbly; the anxiety 
which overcame me threatened to expose my insecurity with 
my new college. I must ascend that final distance maintain- 
ing my composure. Each step became more and more difficult. 
When I finally entered the room the heavy scent of formalde- 
hyde permeated the very foundation of my soul. My eyes 
fixed solidly on the sterile, cold, gray, metal tables covered by 
their thick bulging, brown, canvas covers. Beneath that cover 
must be the cadaver I had come to see; but now I hoped and 
prayed that the table would be empty, in that way we would 
not begin until tomorrow. 

However, there was no possibility of that; for our mentors 
were too shrewd to allow us to procrastinate. Soon after being 
assigned to my table along with three colleagues, we were in- 
structed to begin our dissection. "You begin.", "I'll watch the 
first few days ... I have never dissected before." The bright 
new shiny scalpel fell down against the dusky-brown flesh 
and with an air of sophistocated uncertainty and respect, my 
medical career with anatomy began. 

Our lectures became a symphony in the graphic arts embel- 
lishing those desolate regions of our minds which were never 
formed nor recollected, yet continually permeating our exist- 
ance with the stench of esoteric bull. The stops and frets 
overwhelmed the stasis of the mind with thoughts of ectasy 
and hope that all the world is not painted in "Gray's". I often 
thought that if we could cut off Van Dyke's ear we could 
make him "gooh". The only problem being that his pictures 
were not classics. 

By the time I had gotten to histology I had become a nucle- 
us in my isolated cell where burning candle light flitted over 
the yellowing text to a lovely window through which the real 
world was passing me by. 

Yet all was not dismal as it sounds for the autumn "Show- 
ers" brought forth a new hope for growth and function with- 
in an infinite mind. 
As for genetics: 

What is genetics to mice or men? 
Should it control God's greatest gem? 
Let the sun shine, let days go by, 
Fot if it's His Choice that we should die, 
We should accept it as best we can, 
Perhaps to rise above earth again. 



Oh yes! I remember it well. That was the study of normal 
human bodily functions with special references to the adap- 
tating and autoregulating mechanisms. One of the unique 
features of this course was the direct application of physiol- 
ogical principles to the classroom situation. Some of these 
principles were: "Ether" Reed could place 85% of the stu- 
dents in stage III anesthesia faster than ether alone, which 
implied that his lecture was less soluable in the CNS and 
reached an equilibrium concentration sooner than the ether. 
Another principle which was demonstrated regularly was the 
Fick principle which stated that the flow of students from the 
laboratory was equal to the number of animals terminated 
t by the original number of animals. The average value ob- 
tained was 50 students leaving the lab per two hours + 50. 

The course, itself, consisted of concise dynamic lecturers, 
extremely challenging and exciting laboratory experiences, 
encompassing conferences and those "god-damn" Saturday 
morning quizzes. These quizzes were definitely intellectual 
exercises in futility. Each question was designed to have one 
concise answer based upon an infinite number of combina- 
tions and permutations which eliminated any educated guess- 
es and definitely blew our minds. 

The master mind behind this course was Dr. John C. Scott, 
professor and prominent researcher in cardiovascular phy- 
siology, who became quite concerned about the Fick princi- 
ple's application to our laboratory. Dr. Reed is a quiet peace- 
ful man who could disarm the agitated minds of his students 
and send them as babes into the arms of somnolence. Dr. Al- 
teveer, a dynamic and enthusiastic teacher discussed the 
physical and engineering properities applicable to human 
physiology for the engineers in our class. I guess no one told 
him that we did not have any engineers in the class, but he 
still seemed to have fun. 

Dr. Spitzer has an accent which makes him sound like an 
Hungarian scientist who works with lipid metabolism. How- 
ever, rumor has is that he is actually from Brooklyn and got 
his initial experience making hormones. 

Yet, I must admit, that general physiology was an inter- 
esting course and probably one of the most important in the 
study of Medicine. 



MICROBIOLOGY 



BIOCHEMISTRY 



It became evident to the faculty and staff at the beginning 
of our sophomore year that our class lacked sufficient sophis- 
tication to warrant the institution of a course in cultural nici- 
ties. This course covered such topics as: "The cultural impli- 
cation of when, where and how to kiss your sick girlfriend,'' 
and "The significance of Bar Fly innoculation in the medical 
student population." 

Actually the course delved into the sex life of innumerable 
bacteria and viruses with the ulterior motive of teaching 
clumsy methods of disrupting these activities. It seemed like 
the people in this field could get their kicks in some other way 
than bushwacking bacteria. Even so the bushwackers pre- 
sented a friendly concerned attitude toward us, as students, 
and delivered casual lectures in keeping with this attitude. 

Dr. Bondi was the boss of the entourage consisting of Drs., 
Moat, Hammel, Crowell, Weidanz, Stelos, Landau, and Gu- 
tekunst. Labs promoted active discussions among the stu- 
dents as to which technicians were married, engaged or avail- 
able for culture. Occasionally we would direct our attention to 
the putrid, murky, solutions in the cotton stoppered tubes 
which were required to streak out on agar plates. Now we use 
blood, B-G, or E.M. plates. Maybe we should switch to IM- 
VIC or lactose, lactose A — "what in Hell are we trying to 
prove anyway." "I still think she is married." 

Overall we had an enjoyable six months of microbiology 
and did become culturally oriented. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

The cry of the hounds resounded loud above the bustling 
hum of early morning traffic. Once a week, rain or shine, the 
mighty hunters of fundamental pharmacologic knowledge 
would mount the stairs of Eccles to the plains of basic experi- 
mental research principles. Donned in fresh snowy starched 
habits and crops of tempered steel, we called our hounds 
around us, and with soothing songs of ancient hunter's victo- 
ries, rapidly sent them tumbling to the land of narcolepsy. 
The hunt would soon be finished and the long happy hours at 
the Logan Square Inn, recollecting the events of the day over 
tankards of friendly beer, would begin. 

The hunt was not the only event which occurred in Phar- 
macology, for the masters of Pharmacology had developed an 
organization of outstanding lecturers and sophistocated 
methods of drilling us. 

I must admit that the members of this department were the 
best organized lecturers we had during our first two years. 

The time passed rapidly from the profound concepts of 
drug-actions, through general anesthesia, to sedatives, to 
hypnotics, to tranquillizers, to stimulants, to adrenergic and 
cholingeric drugs, to chelating agents, and finally to 
cathartics. 

After many long arduous hours of memorizing the generic 
names of drugs, we entered the realm of clinical medicine 
where staffmen believed generic was the medical treatment of 
old people. 



Our course in biochemistry was oriented for the high 
school senior who had just graduated from the University of 
Pennsylvania with a degree in chemistry. A few of the more 
relevant things we learned were that toluene is used to pre- 
serve 24 hour urine specimens, and that the majority of men 
in the class did not excrete any 17 Ketosteroids, however, 
most of the lovelies did. 

The Big "D" had just arrived at H.M.C.H. and did not 
know the "easy" technicians; so he had us do it for him. It 
seemed like we spent half of our lives in the labs injecting 
mice and washing their urine out of our ties; but it was fun — 
wasn't it? 

According to Dr. Parient the krebs cycle has 500 more cc's 
than the menstrual cycle, although the latter is much better 
on Blueberry Hill climbs. 

Biochemistry was so logical and intuitively clear that all 
you had to do was memorize lists of lecture notes to pass. The 
only problem arose when half of the lecturers could not read 
their lists correctly tending to confuse the students. Well, it 
doesn't really matter since most of us made it — didn't we? 



PATHOLOGY 

The destruction of human tissue results in arteriolar dila- 
tion with increased blood flow into the area of injury followed 
by increased tissue permeability and cellular infiltration 
with polys. This, "the concept of inflammation," was the 
first pathophysiologic entity which we undertook to dissect, 
synthesize, and mull over in our minds in that cold February 
of 1969. 

"Would you please look at this slide under my 
microscope?" "What am I supposed to see, recognize and/or 
remember for the test?" You said that the dark purple dots 
are polys, but how do you know they are not lymphs? "Oh! 
you have seen them before." "Well, what the hell good does 
that do me?" "Boy! do these guys piss me off." That's the 
way pathology lab went for the first three weeks; until sud- 
denly like the warm morning sun breaking through the thick 
New England fog at noon, we began to comprehend the 
meaning of the material we had read in our books. 

Our lecturers were not exactly stimulating for the content 
was enormous and the detail superficial. We spent many 
hours shifting our gluteus maximus to maintain the circula- 
tion of our lower extremities, while simultaneously struggling 
to maintain tonic contractions of our tired levator palpebrae, 
especially during the lab sessions. 

We encountered Imbriglia's philosophy of education, Dol- 
phin's rheumatic fever, Nedwich's glomerulonephritis, Ko- 
iwai's endometrial hyperplasia, Koprowska's abnormal pap 
smear, Kashatus's clinical pathology conference, Shane's 
T.B., all while motoring onto Appleman's hematometaki- 
nesis. With all that pathology in the department we had to 
learn something. Didn't we. 

Overall, the course was not too bad, considering the time 
allotted and the material covered. 





Patricia Krupp, Ph.D. 



'Listen Mayer, if you don't understand I'll be glad to tutor you in Pharmacology.'' 




Laura Bumara 




Richard Crowell Ph.D.: "Whatever it is. I'm sure it's of viral origin. 




'My mother always wanted me to play the oboe. 





Peter Amenta Ph.D. 




John Augustine Ph.D. 




Mole Street is going straight Republican next year." 





All I hear are bowel sounds.' 



What's all this Bull about a dress code!" 




I used to be 




"I think I smell Them!' 





"Is the alcohol denatured?' 




5 



"Bruce, can I xerox your Community Medicine notes?"' 



a 90 pound weakling." 



i n 





E. Karl Koiwai M.D.: "I'm really smoking my old rolled up lecture notes." 





"I think we should merge Hahnemann with Pepsi. 



10 












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Albert Moat Ph.D.: "Wow, what a figure. 



'It sure doesn't taste like tomato juice. 






11 




"Season's greeting's to the class of 1991 . 

i 




Presented by the class of 1971." 






"UN" 

1 



Berwind Kaufmann M.D. 
"Who stole my 24 hour stool collection?" 





!► 









I saw a man pursuing the horizon; 

Round and round they sped. 

I was disturbed at this; 

I accosted the man. 

"It is futile," I said, 

"You can never-—" 

"You lie," he cried. 

And ran on. 

— Stephen Crane 




"Still using that greasy kid stuff. 




'Up Yours' 




John DiGregorio Ph.D. and Plant 





Robert Alteveer Ph.D.: "What do you mean your dog died of natural 
causes?" 



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Emerson Reed Ph.D.: "The cat is in stage III; the students stage IV." 




Joseph Imbriglia M.D.: "Sermon on the Mount" 



17 









Melvin Benarde, Ph.D.: "This is the most important 
course in med school." 



Andrew Ferko Ph.D. 






Alexander Gero Ph.D. 




"The knee bone is connected to the shin bone.' 
Alexander Nedwich M.D. "Even Joe won't be able to answer this.' 




Jean MacCreight Ph.D.: "A fine friend and teacher.'' 





'California?, sure operator, ... I'll accept the charges." Irena Koprowska M.D.: "I vil show you the new-clay-oos." 

"When Janet walks in, you pull the string and I'll point." 







'It 

"If this gadget doesn't work, you fellows can get a job at Upjohn." 




'Let's see . . . Veins to the heart, . . . arteries from ... or is it ... " 



"How to get the most out of lecture" 



21 





Aaron A. Bechtel — Dr. Iacocca sold me these glasses . 



Joseph R. DiPalma M.D.: "The Bronx is dat way." 




JohnSpitzer M.D. 








f 



JohnC. Scott Ph.D.: "Useful . . . ? Van Sly ke carried one in his blackbag!" 




Hubert E. Appert Ph.D.: "If 
yours doesn't work, fire yours 
and hire ours." 







Thomas M. Devlin Ph.D. 



24 




M 





James K. Alexander Ph.D. 





Jay M.Hammel Ph.D. 



25 






John Dolphin Ph.D.: "If you bought the old 
notes I wouldn't have to write this stuff on the 
board." 




William Kashatus M.D. 



^ 



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Benjamin Calesnick. M.D. : "A new birth control method — Phenyl tri No! No !' 





John R. Little Ph.D. 



27 







Warren Chernick D.Sc "Hold the retractor still Warren !" 






UtflWffE BON 




I'll have the Filet Mignon with Green Beans Almondine." 



29 



1 




Richard R. Gutekunst Ph.D. 





Carol Angstadt Ph.D. 




30 



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Melvin A. Benarde Ph.D. 



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/ 





Clinical Years 



SURGERY 



PSYCHIATRY 



I 



Surgery began at 7:00 A.M. in the Cafeteria of P.G.H. 
where we met our chief and his two assistants. They seemed 
to be nice guys. After discussing the nature of the surgical 
service with special emphasis on the patient load and the 
number of major procedures performed, we began our rounds 
on the third floor of the surgical wing — the I.C.U.. We only 
had one patient there, and he had been there about five 
weeks. He was recovering from an acute bowel obstruction 
and postoperatively developed sub diaphragmatic abscesses, 
congestive heart failure and 3 code 99's. This should be a 
good case since we were informed that pre and post surgical 
care was more important that the surgery itself. 

From the surgical I.C.U. we went to the wards, where we 
found a total of 15 patients. Seven of the patients had ano- 
rectal abscesses, four had sebaceous cysts removed, three had 
lipomas removed and one was a burn case. I asked the chief, 
"If they really did surgery at P.G.H. or had the city turned off 
the electricity in the O.R. so that it was necessary to do the 
procedures in the out patient clinic?" He was not very happy 
with my question but explained that the Hahnemann service 
had a real emergency a month ago requiring 25 units of blood 
from the Blood Bank, and no elective procedures could be per- 
formed until the blood was replaced. 

As the weeks went by we did get some good cases, only to 
find that a junior medical student was required to stand and 
hold the retractors until the venous pooling in his legs was 
sufficent to cause syncope. At that point he could be replaced 
bv one of his colleagues. 

The most rewarding boring experience during our six 
weeks on surgery was the tying of knots. Now you could 
show your parents and friends that you were a real doctor, 
since everyone knows that knot tying during surgery and 
being a "real" doctor are synonymous. 



Speaking of obsessive-compulsives, did you ever have such 
a structural clinical rotation as you did in psychiatry? Every 
minute of the day was scheduled with something or some- 
body. Your free time was generally alloted to getting between 
Hahnemann and P.G.H.. These trips were well worth while 
for I made my first diganosis of hyperkinetic state on the 
Market Street Subway. After observing this gentleman for 
several minutes in the adjoining car, I approached him only to 
find that he was a classmate of mine who had failed to empty 
his bladder before leaving Hahnemann. 

Even with the rigidly structured schedule we could not 
complain too much, for they never really promised us a "Rose 
Garden." I think most of the guys in the psychiatry tract 
would have settled for grass. 

The psychological impact of psychiatry on the minds of 
medical students is phenomenal. During the first 3 weeks, 
75% of our rotation was on the verge of psychological decom- 
pensation with observations and statements as: "Do you 
really think he is psychotic Dr. Fink?" "I have had the same 
thoughts hundreds of times — well, I think he is normal." 
"Oh, you do." "He presently has a working diagnosis of par- 
anoid schizophrenia." 

The tendency to identify with these known psychotic pa- 
tients caused a great deal of stress during the early weeks, 
until the identification turned to isolation and ambivalence. 

We were indeed strangers in a strange land where groping 
too greatly could have sent you whirling through the land of 
magical thinking and dreaming, with only Thorazine to serve 
as "guide and crutch." 

The Psychiatric department of Hahnemann Hospital is 
outstanding in presenting a practical dynamic approach to 
mental illnesses. The mentors, too numerous to individually 
specify, but exemplified by Drs. Belmont, Fink, Hicks, Walk- 
er, West and Hammett, encouraged the students to take an 
active part in the therapeutic sessions, with the students of- 
ten benefitting more than the patients . 



OBSTETRICS and GYNECOLOGY 

Today, we are going to discuss the intricacies of the female 
anatomy. You will notice the sleek full swing of succulent 
adipose tissue warmly winding its circulinear path to the in- 
troitus through which most men's destinies have passed dur- 
ing their life time. 

Yet when you remove the fantasies from the mind by com- 
ing face to face with the very real aspects of female anatomy, 
the task becomes a mere routine without any traumatic aes- 
thetic overtones. 

The girls line up on the hard, cold, old park benches and sit 



for hours, waiting for the medical students and residents to 
arrive. Once the "Doctors" arrive a brief history is taken and 
the patient is placed on the examining table in the lithotomy 
position. The patient will remain in this ungodly position for 
as long as 15 to 20 minutes, or until the pain and spasm in her 
thigh muscles, force her to sit up. After the examination, ap- 
propriate therapy is administered and she is asked to return in 
two weeks for a repeat performance. If the medical students 
are lucky and she is a masochist, she will return. 

However, OB-GYN does not consist entirely of these poor- 
ly functioning clinics, but also deals with problems in endo- 
crinology, surgery, malignancy and infectious disease. 



32 



Clinical Years 



PEDIATRICS 



MEDICINE 



Listening to the sound of the laughing children running 
through the poster plastered corridors on the ninth floor, you 
forget for a moment that they are all here because they are 
sick; perhaps to die during this hospitalization or the next, or 
better still, to go home to their families with no need to return 
for further treatment. 

The state of mind that the prognoses of diseases such as 
cyctic fibrosis, leukemia, ulcerative colitis and neuroblastoma 
have, seem unreal in the small world of happily playing child- 
ren. Yet to explain the implication of a child's disease to those 
tender, pleading, reddened eyes of endlessly praying parents 
calls forth an inhuman strength from your soul, which count- 
ers the tightening grip around your heart, and prevents you 
from crying in their presence. 

Even with the tragedy which presents itself in Pediatric 
Medicine, the warmth and joys of the occasional dramatic 
cures encourages even the most pessimistic to strive toward 
greater levels of therapeutic management. 

The incorporation of social, psychological, educational, and 
medical spheres into a giant ecosystem of total patient care, 
allows the patient and his family to live with their illness. 

The Pediatric department at Hahnemann is composed of 
dedicated clinical pediatricians whose lecture method of 
teaching leaves a lot to be desired as far as the eager strug- 
gling medical student who wants to learn clinical pediatrics is 
concerned. Perhaps with the continued development and im- 
provement of the department this will be rectified. 




Now we enter into that game of all games, where up's man- 
ship and the most recent journal articles make even a spastic 
Junior sound like he knows what he is talking about. Howev- 
er, the truth comes out that first night on call when you hope 
the operator forgets your name or better still your extension 
number. Yet, only ten minutes later, she calls you, to report 
that the new patient on 14 needs an I.V. started. You slowly 
wind your way up the spiral staircase where each landing 
brings forth an increasing anxiety about the task you must 
complete; for a failure now could ruin your career in medi- 
cine, destroying your precarious ego. 

"Let's see, what will I need? — I.V. bottle, alcohol sponge, 
rubber tubing, 18 gauge intracath, tape and armboard. That's 
all I can think of — I would ask the nurse but I can't now — . I 
had better re-read the directions on the intracath insert before 
I go to the patient's room. Oh!, I think I know how it 
works." 

In the patient's room, with a calm and sophistocated man- 
ner you apply the rubber tubing to the upper arm. Nothing 
happens, the patient doesn't show any veins on that arm; try 
the other one — this arm is the same. "Why in hell don't these 
patients come in during the day — at the least the seniors 
would be around to help. They like to show how smart they 
are." 

Five venapunctures and three intracaths later, you finally 
get into the vein with a number 19 gauge butterfly which you 
secure with two rolls of tape and an armboard up to the 
shoulder. 

So far you have had a good night, you have put in you first 
I.V. and it only took you three hours and forty minutes. 

Medicine continues: each day you become slightly more 
confident and competent. The staffman, resident and intern 
begin to respect your opinion and clinical judgement, even in 
its naviete. You begin to feel good inside now that all of those 
long hours of studying are paying off. You develop a great 
respect for your staffman and tend to identify with him. 
Medicine is definitely the best service we see at Hahnemann 
and the people are great. 




Isadore Brodsky M.D., Sigmund Kahn M.D., "This year we'll use Luther 
Brady's statistics." 



Peter Sigmann M.D. 



33 




Edward Ciaccio Ph.D.: "The Pied Piper did what?" 




Henry Appleman M.D.: "The extrovert that "Motored on. 




All of the above . . 
Some of the above 
None of the above 




"Van Dyke wants me to stay after class." 



Mary Jane Showers Ph.D.: "Thank you very much, but flowers are not 
really necessary." 



34 





'I don't care what you say, I want Dr. Lichtenfeld! 



"Remember, you're not an Extern anymore, you introduce yourself as 
Doctor." 





Dr. Leonard Dreifus 
"Goodnight Bill" 



Dr. William Likoff 
"Goodnight Len" 



35 






m 



"Just because I didn't hear him say — close to the knot!!" 



Arthur Lipschutz, M.D. 



I 





Hugh Bennett, M.D.: "I wouldn't throw you a curve!" 




Edward Del Guercio M.D.: "It's not what you can do for 
Hahnemann but what Hahnemann can do for you ." 



And Rich has two just like this? 




Paul Fink M.D. "and then this big bird came over ..." 




«v 



Annie Wang, M.D.: "Bloody Mary. 



Dan Morello, M.D.: "That's right, Heroin overdose is the answer to 
diarrhea." 




t \ J 

Paul Gonick, M.D.: "A size 50 French, WOW!' 






• 




I 




Charles Wolferth, M.D.: "When I can't get stasis, I use the old bear 
hug, like this." 





Dr. Gibbons, I don't understand why Hahnemann is called 'The Mecca' 











Giulio Barbero, M.D.: "Let's talk about death." 




Barry FarberM.D.: "We're going to Cuba; the first man to touch me is dead!' 

41 




"By golly, there is an ant in the view box. 



Dr. Donald Fishman, M.D. 





Nikolay Dimitrov, M.D.: "If you want to get an elevator 
around here, you've got to build your own." 




Jewell Osterholm, M.D.: "I always drink, when I operate. 



42 




Paul Gebhart M.S. : "Do you think we can get a team hair transplant 





'Quinto said he'd like to give you a cardiac massage. " 




Teruo Matsumoto M .D. 



David Major M.D. 





Wilbur Oaks M.D.: "That's cute Ron but we 
usually culture anthrax in a plate." 



Amedeo Bondi Ph.D.: "Dr. Lewis wants to know if the student who cultured Anthrax on his hand can 
go to Gyn clinic." 



Richard Torpie M.D.: "Just 1000 radsmyDear!' 






Percival Levinson M.D. 



i 

i 

Leon Kauffman M.D.: "... and then I showed her my Byrd. 

44 



Paul Gonick M.D.: "Who's a moile." 



P 




A \ 













JeffLeffertsM.D. 





Demetrius Saris M.D.: "This little piggy went to market. 




n 




46 






Bruce Mac Fadyen M.D.: "Doctor says she had just a touch of the 
pregnancy." 



John Moyer M.D.: "Wilbur, see if you can get me an appointment 
with Mark Berger." 




"That'sthe 
last rectal I'll 
do without 
gloves." 





Domenic J. Pontarelii M.D. 






50 



Old Men 

People expect old men to die, 
They do not really mourn old men. 
Old men are different. People look 
At them with eyes that wonder when . . . 
People watch with unshocked eyes . . 
But the old men know when an old man dies. 

Ogden Nash 





Millard CrollM.D. 



Stanley Spitzer M.D.: "She's got two betz cells held together by a 
spirochete." 





'Well, how do you pay for your tuition?' 



John Gundy M.D.: "What do you mean I cut myself shaving?" 





Daniel Mason M.D. 



"Don't I look like a surgeon?' 






James LeeM.D.: "This Dale Carnegie is some writer. 



Stanley Spitzer M.D. : "Tell the old crock I've got an emergency. 



'Nothing like running water with a great view." 




'We're going to call the book "Human Sexual Response. 




Holmes' "Pig Sty" 




Dr. Elliott Mancall 





Sheldon Bender M.D. 







V 




i •'*} 



Eleanor Shaheen M.D.: "Giulio 
likes me in my mini.'' 




Donald Faust M.D.: "What X-rays?" 

Eugene Coodley M.D.: "Who's 
taking P.G.H. over ? . . ." 






Ma-j7py f/a-f^^K., M. V. 



J 



Herman S. Belmont M.D. 



56 



m 



"It's soft, warm, and mushy 



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■ 

4 


2 

(! 

» 


■ 

i 


1 


\ 

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If 

H 

5 



you can roll it into a ball 



and you can stick it behind your ear. 




■■i 




■ 



• 



V 




Luther W.Brady M.D. 




Richard Hicks M.D.: "When all else fails 



Alberto Adam M.D.: "When nitroglycerin fails 





"Consider it a professional courtesy."' 



Dr. Jewell Osterholm M.D.: "When dilantin fails 




58 




Paul Fink M.D. 





Dr. Sigmund Kahn M.D.: "No mama, 
Cytoxan not chicken soup." 






59 





Anthony Renzi M.D.. "This film was rated X. 



Marcus 

Welby,M.D. 





'Don't worry, I'll tell you all about sex." 



60 




Dr. Luis Blasco: "2500 Grams of air by C-section. 











"I memorized 24 
pages of notes last 
night!" 




George C. Lewis M.D. 



Richard Gibbons M.D. 

■■I 




Dr. Gill 



Dr. Hong and Dr. Park. 










'If I cash your check, will you buy something?" 



David Segal M.D.: "I'm a chest man myself." 





Wilbur Oaks M.D.: "Listen John, only one of us can run 
this department . . either me or Susie, . . . but not 
both!!" 





63 




Morton Perlman M.D.: "That's the funniest thing I've heard in my whole 
life." 




What is G.C. Conjunctivitis?' 








Quinto'sback?!' 




64 



Marshall Klavan M.D.: "Who put the Lippes loop in my soup?" 





Charles Wolferth M.D.: "Baronofsky, I don't want to tell 
you again." 



Edward Coppola M.D.: "Did someone say Kidney?' 





Gaddo Onesti M.D.: "Spitzer said — Galloping Metastatic Gournischt — but I can't find that disease in 
my file." 



65 




Howie wake up! 'Lemme alone I'm wearing Berger's alarm clock!' 





i 




JoelChinitzM.D. 



Allan Schwartz M.D. 




"Slobbovian Journal of Nephrology, 1904, 102: 
417." 





Oscar Weiner M.D.: "Did you enjoy the show Mrs. Lincoln?' 



'Right hemiparesis my ass!" 






Leslie Nicholas M.D.: "Where did he have 
G.C.?" 




John 

CluneM.D. 



Robert Bower M.D. 



Children are just little adults !' 



Vincent Zarro M.D. : "... in the joints ! ' 






"The patient needs a stat EKG, a portable chest film, and my resident." 



What do you mean, I'm orally fixated?" 




Ralph Shaw M.D.: Hahnemann's sugar daddy. 



Robert Goldstein M.D. 



68 






Phi Delta Epsilon Fraternity 



All the negatives !?! 





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T. Bender M.D. 



v 










69 Ismail Kazem M.D. 



Alan Garfield M.D. 








Harry J. Lessig, Editor-in-Chief. 



Patricia A. Camody, Associate Editor. 





Contributors 

Writers 

Edward McMahon 
Herbert Goodheart 
Richard Weismer 
Mark Berger 
Bruce Levy 
George Kirkpatrick 

Photography 

Frederic Schif fer 
Michael Gotthelf 
Ward Heinrich 



Edward Lamon 
Photography Editor 



E. Karl Koi wai — Advisor. 



Irv Franklin 
Business Manager 



'71 

IDE DIC STAFF 




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FACULTY 

PATRONS OF MEDIC SEVENTY ONE 



Jules C. Abrams, M.D. 
George Adams, M.D. 
E. T. Angelakos, M.D. 
Consuela Aquirre, M.D. 
Guilio J. Barbero, M.D. 
Herman S. Belmont, M.D. 
Hugh D. Bennett, M.D. 
Amedeo Bondi, Ph. D. 
LeRoy I. Braddock, Ph. D. 
Benjamin Calesnick, M.D. 
Kenneth Chalal, M.D. 
Eugene Coodley, M.D. 
Lucy Cook, B.S. 
Edward Coppola, M.D. 
Oscar Corn, M.D. 
Millard N.Croll, M.D. 
Marvin Derezin, M.D. 
Thomas M. Devlin, Ph. D. 
Nickolay V. Dimitrov, M.D. 
Joseph R.DiPalma, M.D. 

Leonard S. Dreifus, M.D. 

Philip Fieman, M.D. 

Paul J. Fink, M.D. 

Carl C. Fischer, M.D. 

Raul Fleischmajer, M.D. 

Van Buren O. Hammett, M.D. 

Richard E. Hicks, M.D. 

Victor F. Iacocca, Ph. D. 

Irving H. Itkin, M.D. 

Leon S. Kauffman, M.D. 

WillainC.Kashatus, M.D. 

Jung Sun Kim, M.D. 

Kwan Eun Kim, M.D. 

Marshall Klavan, M.D. 

Eichi K. Koiwai, M.D. 

Leonard J. Kryston, M.D. 



James H. Lee, M.D. 
George C. Lewis, Jr., M.D. 
William Likoff, M.D. 
Elliot L. Mancall, M.D. 
Wendy B. Marlowe, M.A. 
Teruso Matsumoto, M.D. 
John H. Moyer, M.D. 
David Naide, M.D. 
Leslie Nicholas, M.D. 
Henry I. Nichols, M.D. 
Wilbur W. Oaks, Jr., M.D. 
Gaddo Onesti, M.D. 
Axel K. Olsen, M.D. 
Fredrick W. Pairent, Ph. D. 
AneelN. Patel, M.D. 
Alexander E. Pearce, M.D. 
Domenic J. Pontarelli, M.D. 
Edwin J. Powell, M.D. 
Saris S. Saris, M.D. 
Victor P. Satinsky, M.D. 
Normal G. Schneeberg, M.D. 
Bernard L. Segal, M.D. 
Eleanor Shaheen, M.D. 
Mary Jane C. Showers, Ph. D. 
Peter Sigmann, M.D. 
Stanley Spitzer, M.D. 
Leonard Stanton, M.S. 
Seymour Stein, M.D. 
Patrick B. Storey, M.D. 
Charles Swartz, M.D. 
Sydney Waldman, M.D. 
Harry S. Weaver, Jr., M.D. 
Franklin H. West, M.D. 
Charles C. Wolferth, M.D. 
Vincent J. Zarro, M.D., Ph. D. 



72 



PARENTS 

PATRONS OF MEDIC SEVENTY ONE 



Dr. and Mrs. Solomon M. Abbey 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Abrams 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel R. Askew 

Dr. and Mrs. Leonard J. Barron 

Mr. and Mrs. Abraham L. Becker 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Bednarek 

Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Berger 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Black 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Paul Burkett 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Caldwell 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Camody 

Dr. and Mrs. A. Guy Campo 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry H. Canton 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell L. Carlson, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Theron B. Childs 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Cicciarelli 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Connell, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James V. Convery 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Rufus B. Edris 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Martin Eichelberger, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Ervin, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Etley, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Franklin 

Dr. and Mrs. H. K. Gabroy 

Mrs. P. J. Gambescia 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Giannitti 

Mrs. Rose Goodheart 

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Gosper 

Mrs. Theodore L. Greenwald 

Dr. and Mrs. Ward D. Heinrich 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Hershkowitz 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Hertz 

Mr. and Mrs. William Knox 



Mrs. Lois S. Kolb 
Mrs. Anna Kopycinski 
Dr. and Mrs. Wilmer O. Kron 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Krutsick 
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Lamon 
Dr. and Mrs. Philip M. Lessig 
Dr. and Mrs. Howard E. Liston 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter MacFadyen 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Matarazzo 
Mr. and Mrs. John McMahon 
Dr. and Mrs. Sol Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Miles 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Murray 
Mr. and Mrs. Mario Nazzaro 
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Robinson 
Mr. and Mrs. Julius Rossi 
Mrs.M. A. Ruddell 
Dr. and Mrs. Paul S. Schantz 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Schiffer 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Shames 
Mr. and Mrs. Eli Sherman 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Sicherman 
Mr. and Mrs. John Snyder 
Mr. and Mrs. Calvin R. Stafford 
Mrs. Esther C. Tesauro 
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Tonkon 
Miss Mary H. Tumola 
Mr. and Mrs. George Wasserman 
Mr. and Mrs. David Winson 
Dr. and Mrs. Herman L. Wohl 
Mr. and Mrs. William Zahniser 



73 



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in the Setting of a Superior 
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FOR INFORMATION 

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ALTOONA IS A 

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COME AND SEE US! 
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CONEMAUGH VALLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

JOHNSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 
1970 - HOUSE STAFF - 1971 







William H. Bowers 
M.D. 



Dorryl Lee Buck, Jr. 
M.D. 



Robert Cantor, Jr. 
M.D. 



William M. Cseh 
M.D. 







Dwight A. Kauffman 
M.D. 



Gerald L. Meester 
M.D. 



James M. Moses 
M.D. 



Gregory Sobczak 
M.D. 







Nathan O. Thomas 
M.D. 



Robert H. Tomhave 
M.D. 



76 John J. Vecchio 

M.D. 



William R. Wynert 
M.D. 



DOCTORS OF 71 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

From the Medical Staff 
and 

Sisters of Saint Francis 

SAINT AGNES HOSPITAL 

A TEACHING AFFILIATE 

Department of Medical Education 
John P. Cossa, M.D., Director 

Department of Medicine 
Joseph M. Gambescia, M.D. 

Department of Surgery 
Frederick A. DeClement, M.D. 

Department of Obstetrics / Gynecology 

Edward R. Lucente, M.D. 

Nicholas A. Policarpo, M.D. 




When dining out becomes a 
special occasion . . . 

The Stratford Garden 

Famous for fine food, gracious 
service and expertly-prepared 
cocktails. Popular prices. Dinner 
music 6:30 to 8:30 PM. 

The Hunt Room 

A quaint English Tavern. Lunch- 
eon, Dinner and After Theater 
Snacks. Sunday liquor service 
1 to 10 PM. 



THE 




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Electrical Engineers and Contractors 

Brand Name Appliances 

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211-213 North Broad Street, Phila., Pa. 19107 
Telephone: 563-0590 



BOERICHE & TAFEL 


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and 




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Manufacturing Pharmacists and Publishers 


Suppliers of 


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1720 Cherry Streets 


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Professional Planning Services, 


Zamsky Studios 


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"Carry out the two fundamental surgical requirements: 
see what you are doing and leave a dry field." 



CHARLES H. MAYO, M.D. 



WARMEST CONGRATULATIONS 
AND BEST OF LUCK 

Department of Surgery 



"Get your facts first, and then 
you can Distort them as you please.'' 
MARK TWAIN 

Congratulations to the Class of L971 



Department of Biological Chemistry 



"WITH BEST WISHES TO THE 
CLASS OF 1971 FROM THE 



Department of Obstetrics And Gynecology 



— Reproduction is our business!" 



"IN SCIENCE THE CREDIT GOES TO THE MAN 
WHO CONVINCES THE WORLD, NOT TO THE MAN 
TO WHOM THE IDEA FIRST OCCURS." 



SIR WILLIAM OSLER, M.D. 



Department of Anatomy 



CONGRATULATIONS 

and 

ALL GOOD WISHES 

to 

All Members of the 

Class of 1971 

from the 



Department of Mental Health Sciences 




Partners IN HEALTH: 

• You 

• Your Doctor 

• Your Hospital 

AND 
BLUE CROSS and BLUE SHIELD 

• • • 

Blue Cross of Greater Philadelphia 

and 

Pennsylvania Blue Shield 




CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 



CROZER-CHESTER 



MEDICAL CENTER 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

ANATOMIC PATHOLOGY, 
CLINICAL PATHOLOGY, CYTOLOGY 




" . . . the man of science in searching for the truth must ever be guided by the cold logic 
of facts, and be animated by scientific imagination ..." 

William J. Mayo, M.D. 



David S. Perlman — Vice President 

KEYSTONE VENDING COMPANY 

3901 "M" Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19124 

Phila. Phone # PI4-7800 

NJ. #609-964-1500 



Compliments of 



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BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 71 




HAHNEMANN 
BOOKSTORE 



Shirley E. Mohn 
Manager 





Church Home and Hospital 




Baltimore, Maryland 


"Treatment begins with the first words 


"A unique opportunity to obtain superior quality 


spoken at the first diagnostic consulta- 


training for clinical practice" 


tion; and the more time is spent on the 




history, the less time is likely to be need- 
ed for treatment." 


Internships: Medical and Surgical 


John Apley 


Residencies: Medicine, Surgery, Ob-Gyn 


Department of Pediatrics 


For information, write to: 




Director of Medical Education 




Church Home and Hospital 




Baltimore, Maryland 21231 




COMPLIMENTS AND BEST WISHES OF 


BEST WISHES 




TO THE 




CLASS OF 1971 


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Founded 1847 


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drug research 

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PHARMACEUTICAL MANUFACTURERS 



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CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

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AND 

WELCOME 

TO YOUR 

HAHNEMANN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



DEDICATED TO SERVING 
YOUR COLLEGE 



In memorium 



Mark Prager 



classmate 



Medic Seventy-One 



Medic Seventy-One is a new and different concept in year- 
books. Because of this new innovation, there were stringent 
financial, literary, and social changes to be considered. The 
staff had several goals: to produce a book which was not too 
sentimental, but would have a layout which would be in keep- 
ing with our tradition, to have more people participating in 
the book's development, and to depict through pictures and 
writing a record which would be representative of our years 
of labor at Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, and 
would be pleasing to all the factions in our class and our stu- 
dent body. With these guidelines the staff spent many hours 



in dedicated work in the hope that all will be received 
favorably. 

While we were learning and maturing into physicians, 
many changes were taking place in our medical school and 
profession as well as in the rest of the American scene. It is on 
these many changes that I would like to share this final note. I 
would hope that the following poem would typify most beau- 
tifully and poetically not only the changes that we wish to 
make, but also the rare and precious gift of freedom we have 
in our country which makes this descent and diversity 
possible. 



A LOVER'S QUARREL WITH THE WORLD 



O Lord, we love this country. 

And because we love it, 

We pray for the courage to quarrel with it, 

As did the prophets of old, 

And as do the men of conscience today. 

Give us the courage to quarrel 

With the worship of success and status, 

With the belief that people are less precious than property 

And with the myth that in missiles there is real safety. 

Give us the courage to quarrel 
With the idolators who say: 
'My country right or wrong' 
Instead of saying: 
'My country — when it is right, 
My country to be made right, 
Whenever it is wrong.' 

Give us the courage to quarrel 

With those who believe we can afford 

For a journey to the moon 

But who claim that we cannot afford millions 

To abolish poverty here on earth. 

Give us the courage to quarrel 

With a society that spends more on cosmetics 

Than it does on charity, 

More on cigarettes 

Than it does on cancer research. 

Give us the courage to quarrel 

With those who find it easier to condemn Communism 

Than to practice the teachings of Democracy. 

Give us the courage to quarrel 
With those who dump surpluses 
And who pay farmers not to plant, 
While human beings starve 
Here and around the world. 



Give us the courage to quarrel 

With those who can appreciate the patriotism of a soldier 

But who cannot understand the courage of a conscientious 

objector. 

Give us the courage to quarrel 

With all the forces within our society 

That dehumanize, that profane, and that separate men. 

But let our quarreling, O Lord, not be destructive. 
Let it be out of love, not envy. 
Let it be in order to correct and improve — 
Not just for the sake of tearing down. 

Let us be counted among those 
Who alleviate pain by sharing it. 

Let us be counted among those 

Who are not satisfied with the status quo — 

But who yearn and work for a better world. 

May we bring into this world, 

A bit more truth, a bit more justice, 

A bit more love 

Than there would have been, 

If we had not loved the world enough 

To quarrel with it — 

Out of a vision of what it out to be. 

May our prayers and our deeds be pleasing to You, O Lord, 
Whose lover's quarrel with the world 
Is the history of mankind. 



Reprinted From 

New Prayers For The High Hory Days E.D. by Rabbi Jack Riemer. Media Judaica Inc. (NY. -Jerusa- 
lem). 1970. 



H.L. 



87 



Acknowledgements 



Patricia Camody was the associate editor doing an outstanding 
job. Without her help the book could never have been completed. 

Mr. Robert Johnston whose professional photographic talents 
added much to the quality of the book. His help was far in excess 
of that required or expected. 

Mr. William O'Brien, the publisher's representative, was both 
personally and professionally interested in our yearbook, helping 
the staff with many of the new innovations. 

Ed Lamon was photography editor whose help was much needed 
and appreciated. 

Irv Franklin was business manager doing a fine job. 

Dr. E. Karl Koiwai, faculty adviser to the Medic Seventy-One, 
gave unselfishly of his time and counsel. 

Miss Rita Camody for her assistance in the design of our dedica- 
tion pages. 

Miss Laura Bumara for her help in distributing yearbook material. 

Media Judaica, Inc. 1679 Broadway, New York City for permis- 
sion to use "A Lover's Quarrel with the World," reprinted from 
New Prayers For The High Holy Days, Ed. by Jack Riemer, 1970. 

Type style was palatino. 

The photographer was Zamsky Studios. 

The publisher was American Yearbook Company. 

To my wife Faith for her understanding, guidance and help dur- 
ing the formulation, correction and distribution of this 
publication. 

Harry J. Lessig 
Editor-in-chief 



88 






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